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I miss my emotionally abusive (ex-)boyfriend.

HomeForumsRelationshipsI miss my emotionally abusive (ex-)boyfriend.

This topic contains 34 replies, has 12 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of John John 4 months, 2 weeks ago.

Viewing 6 posts - 31 through 36 (of 36 total)
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  • #120332
    Profile photo of Aballa
    Aballa
    Participant

    JJC,

    I understand that 35 years is an extremely long period of time to undergo such abuse and I know how difficult it is to get out – especially as your mental state is probably very disoriented as a result of the abuse you have endured. And even though I have never been in an emotionally abusive relationship as long as you have, I can imagine the extreme difficulty you are experiencing emotionally. But you must not give up.

    At least start by creating an escape plan. Are you dependent on your partner in any way? Do you have dependent children with your partner? Is there anywhere and anyone you can go to? Put all your important and necessary belongings together in one place so that if you need to escape, you can easily take what you need and leave (including any pets and their documents). Is there anything that may threaten your safety (either before or after you leave)?

    Creating an escape plan is the first step. Getting out is the second. Overcoming the emotional trauma is in my opinion the third and most painful step and the healing process can take a really long time. But it is all possible and once you’ve reached the other side of the healing process, you will have your life back again. You can be happy and do whatever you want with your life without someone constantly watching over you. And you will be able to set new boundaries from this education so that it never happens to you again. Please, at least take the first step by creating an escape plan.

    One of the posters on this thread, MamaD, recommended a book by Lundy Bancroft called “Why does he do that? Inside the minds of Angry and Controlling Men”. I read the book and it has helped me so much and I would also recommend you read it.

    #120333
    Profile photo of Aballa
    Aballa
    Participant

    dee010812,

    I’m so glad you have found comfort from this post. Everything you say is so right. We know exactly what we have to do but the emotions we go through are what controls us. Leaving is so painful – even more so with narcissists because of the trauma we go through. But it is by far the best option for sure. Once we are at the end of the healing process, we would have gained back our lives, our freedom, our boundaries and a huge education.

    Keep going! You are just beginning your new life and with each day that passes, the light at the end of this dark tunnel gets bigger and bigger! I wish you strength and peace.

    #120548
    Profile photo of John
    John
    Participant

    Aballa,

    The escape plan you refer to should be very easy for me. At least in theory. There have been countless plans over the years and 12 months ago I rented a house to go and live in. It was a detailed plan (one of many). It wasn’t until 3 months after the rental period started that I managed to move in there but I only stayed just a few weeks before going back. I have no idea why I went back and as soon as I did, I wanted to leave again but have not been able to do so. I spent the rest of this summer and early autumn trying to get back to the rented house but couldn’t bring myself to do it because of my emotional state, which has been truly horrible. I have been a mess. The rental period was for 12 months and I stayed there for less than 1 month. Needless to say it was a very expensive exercise but I had to try and would do it all over again as the expense involved has little meaning relative to the bigger picture. In practical terms, there is nothing holding me back as I have financial security and there are no children involved. The plans you suggest have all been put in place on multiple occasions but nothing ever works out for me because of the pain and suffering, which overcomes me whenever I try to implement the plans. I don’t know why this happens to me. I know it is irrational and out of all proportion and I know that it is all tied up with my wife’s abusive behaviour and manipulation, resulting in psychological control. It’s a very powerful, terror inducing, influence from which I can’t seem to escape or switch off. I can not cope with it and I cease to function as a rational person whenever I try to leave. Good luck with your new found freedom and you must stay away from the addictive behaviour that is a huge part of these toxic relationships that we have been subjected to. It poisons the spirit until there is nothing left but an empty person. Take the antidote – not the poison.

    #121546
    Profile photo of Aballa
    Aballa
    Participant

    Oh JJC, how I wish I was there for you. I wish I could physically take you out of this prison you are in. I know how it feels, it’s an illness. Please keep trying and please don’t give up. You deserve to be happy. You deserve to be free. You can always talk to me if you need someone to talk to. Be strong. xx

    #122139
    Profile photo of John
    John
    Participant

    Aballa. Thanks for your kind words. I won’t give up. I can’t do that but part of me thinks that life would be much easier if I could.

    #146027
    Profile photo of Bethani
    Bethani
    Participant

    I’ve recently become aware of narcissistic personality disorder – when I read your post that was the first thing that came to my mind, that he fits it on every count, particularly when you said you “had become him.” I think that’s a really surreal feeling that only people who have been in that situation will fully understand-how it takes you over. I’m glad to see you’ve come out in a much better place. 🙂

    In reading John’s post- my heart goes out to you and any others who feel trapped in this way. I’ve been in an on and off narcissistic relationship/friendship for the past 15 years and have recently cut off contact and I completely understand the overwhelming ufge to continually go back to and hold on to the abusive relationship. This is actually a very real addiction- chemicals called peptides code to the psychological pain and you literally become addicted to the pain.
    <p style=”text-align: left;”>If you’re struggling to let go, get yourself back, just get through the second by second fight for survival, I recommend looking up Melanie Tonia Evans. She has a program that helps you release the pain and really heal. There are also a bunch of free resources and valuable articles on her website. It’s been the #1 thing that has significantly helped me recover.</p>
     

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