Menu

I'm Miserably Anxious

HomeForumsTough TimesI'm Miserably Anxious

New Reply

This topic contains 2 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  anita 1 week, 2 days ago.

Viewing 3 posts - 1 through 3 (of 3 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #311759

    Aiko
    Participant

    Hi all,

    I am miserably anxious and I don’t know what to do.

    I am someone who does a lot of work and self development, i’ve also had therapist. can’t afford one now, will get one next month. But i’ve had one up until 2 months ago.

    I’ve had anxiety all my life and I have been able to manage it, but recently i lost a family member and was abused, and dealing with some other stressors and it was too much at one time. I’ve been so anxious , my stress manifest physically and as paranoid compulsions about my health. Losing my family member suddenly and unexpectedly scares me into thinking I will die from some terrible illness.

    The anxiety has triggered pains and flare ups in my body. I was prescribed ativan for short term use and some of the pain went away. then they gave me a long term ssri lexapro and I was afraid to take it. I took it for the first time today and I was realllllly anxious, so anxious i thought i was going to have a heart attack.

    i dont have family , and im going through it alone and i really need a hug or to be held. and i feel so much emotional pain from being alone i dont know what to do. plus its hard to let anyone in or close.

    Im so tired of my compulsions about my health, worrying, random pains, and anxiousness which is through the roof at times. and I am having SI because of how miserable I am.

    I don’t know how to handle it all and feel like things are closing in.

    If anyone can help by letting me know their journey with meds.

    And also, their journey with losing someone. like did you fear you were going to die too? im usually not afraid of death but it triggered fear.

    And most importantly tips to manage anxiousness thats moreso going to calm my body. most tips online say “counteract the thoughts” but my anxiousness isnt really conscious thoughts, its just a feeling in my body.

     

    thanks!

    #311817

    Peggy
    Participant

    Hi Aiko,

    I’m sorry to read your sad story and that you are suffering so much from anxiety.  Stress leads to physical pain/illness.  Stress depletes the immune system and opens the way for illness to manifest within the body.  I don’t know if you can make an appointment with a stress counselor who can give you practical advice on how to deal with your anxiety rather than some-one who just talks to you.

    You probably need to learn correct breathing techniques – perhaps it sounds too simple to say that anxiety can be reduced by learning to breathe properly but it is the truth.  Perhaps you could join a group that teaches Meditation to help you with this.

    There are a vast array of products on the market that you can listen to which encourage relaxation and visualization techniques as well as helping with pain relief.  Perhaps you could locate one or two and see how you get on with them.

    Perhaps you could join a Bereavement Group run by a counselor and express your fears in a safe environment.  Before you know it, someone will be giving you a hug.

    I hope some of the above is of help to you.

    Peggy

     

     

    #311839

    anita
    Participant

    Dear Aiko:

    I suggest you give Lexapro a chance to work. SSRI medications do work for a lot of people and I know a particular person that took Lexapro during a very stressful time in his life and it helped him, took the edge of his feelings, lowered his distress and he came off it after a few months. I took another SSRI, Zoloft for many years.

    There is a close connection between thoughts and fear. It is when you think that you may be deathly sick that you feel the fear. When you don’t think of it, you… forget to be afraid, correct?

    It is our thoughts that scare us. Sometimes we feel fear when no particular thought is present, but often a thought precedes the fear.

    But a thought in itself is not dangerous.

    Pay attention as you start thinking that you are sick- the thought itself, is it dangerous? If you stop fearing the thought itself, you will be less alarmed when that thought occurs to you once again.

    Let me know if what I just wrote to you means anything to you, will you?

    anita

Viewing 3 posts - 1 through 3 (of 3 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic. Please log in OR register.