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Boyfriend drunkenly got with another woman while we were broken up.

HomeForumsTough TimesBoyfriend drunkenly got with another woman while we were broken up.

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This topic contains 24 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  Aiyana Henderson 2 weeks, 5 days ago.

Viewing 10 posts - 16 through 25 (of 25 total)
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  • #310437

    anita
    Participant

    Dear Alexandria:

    Reads to me that there is a lot of hostility in this relationship, hurting each other. Lots of drama and trouble. Probably better that you end it (for his sake, no less than for your sake), but end the relationship for good this time, no  longer breaking up and getting back together.

    anita

    • This reply was modified 2 months, 1 week ago by  anita.
    #310447

    Alexandria
    Participant

    I’m going to think on this and get back to you.

    #310455

    anita
    Participant

    Okay, Alexandria.

    anita

    #310467

    Alexandria
    Participant

    I agree we can get a little more hostile than we normally would. And if I felt like our relationship wouldn’t progress I would leave it but seeing as we both love each other and keep trying to figure it out. I want to pursue this. We both love each other and refuse to let one another go, which makes it hard to let go. I have never been in this situation before and I know there is no right way to figure everything out but I can’t help the way I feel right now. Which is wanting to sort everything out. I’m grateful I reached out because now I know I think I know what I want and what do to going forward.

    #310473

    anita
    Participant

    Dear Alexandria:

    “we can get a little more hostile than we normally would”-  you shouldn’t get hostile at all, not a bit, not a lot, not at all. It is possible to have a zero-hostility relationship.

    “We both love each other and refuse to let one another go”- then let go of aggression: no more yelling, no more name calling, no more attacking each other.

    If the two of you get married and have children, you will be practiced by then to provide a peaceful home for your children where they will not witness aggression between their parents, nor will they be the direct recipients of aggression. (Children always get damaged by witnessing or directly experiencing aggression in their home, and often for life).

    anita

    • This reply was modified 2 months, 1 week ago by  anita.
    #310479

    Alexandria
    Participant

    Thank you for the reminder Anita, I completely agree with you there. I also like the suggestions those are really that simple to do.

    My boyfriend grew up in a hostile home of name calling, and yelling and I know this has for sure affected the way he gets when he is hurt, he gets dramatic and angry. I grew up in a household of withdrawing, and anger.. so thus I withdraw.

    #310481

    anita
    Participant

    Dear Alexandria:

    No doubt you and your boyfriend will feel angry again. Anger is a normal emotion all humans and it is not going anywhere. Key is to not automatically react to the emotion with hostile behavior, such as the name calling, yelling, and silent treatments.

    Healing from childhoods in hostile homes, be it directly aggressive or passive aggressive, takes intentional work that includes practicing feeling anger and at the same time, not reacting aggressively to the anger. Alternative reactions: taking a walk outside to relax, a hot or  cold shower… then sitting together and talking respectfully about the issue at hand.

    anita

    #310487

    Alexandria
    Participant

    I appreciate the advice for when we are angry. I think a cold shower would really help him/us, I was also think that removing ourselves completely from this particular group is a good idea every time we are around them something happens sometimes with us but most the time there is something always going on with these guys they are toxic friends for both of us and that’s why I’ve kept my distance, limiting our alcohol intake or choosing not to discuss any of our troubles when we are under the influence of alcohol, and most importantly actively just working through our anger when it arises. Instead of reacting.

    #310493

    anita
    Participant

    Dear Alexandria:

    Good thinking on your part! It takes thinking and coming up with a plan abut how to minimize anger (not interacting with certain people, including certain family members!), limiting alcohol and whatever else it takes. There are books and workbooks about dealing with anger/ managing anger, resolving conflicts, effective communication/ interpersonal skills- these are available in libraries and book stores. I bet there are online resources as well. It will be very worthwhile to utilize such (inexpensive or free) resources.

    My former therapist taught me this principle regarding effective interpersonal skills: use EAR which stands for Empathy, Assertiveness and Respect. (Assertiveness itself is a very, very useful skill).

    anita

    #319577

    Aiyana Henderson
    Participant

    Hey Alexandria, I hope things have worked out for you. Has your situation changed?

Viewing 10 posts - 16 through 25 (of 25 total)

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