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7 Ways to Get Past Tough Situations Quickly

Smiling in the Rain

“Life is 10 percent what happens to you and 90 percent how you respond to it.” -Charles Swindoll

One day, everything seems great in your world—maybe not perfect, but overall things are going to plan. And then something happens.

You lose your job, or someone you love, or your home, or maybe even your health.

It isn’t fair. You don’t deserve it. You didn’t see it coming. You didn’t plan for it. You have so many feelings and frustrations you don’t know what to do first—or if you want to do anything at all.

It would be easier to sit around feeling bad, looking for people to blame and complain to. Rehashing what you could have done to make things happen differently. Or what you would have done if you only realized before. Or what other people should have done to help you.

All great options if you want to maximize your misery and feel justified in doing it. Not so great if what you want is to deal and move on.

You have to do this eventually when something bad happens, and the faster you do it, the sooner you’ll improve your situation.

There is no shortage of opportunities to practice dealing well. If you’d like to work on improving the 90 percent of life that is how you respond, you may find these tips helpful:

1. Make acceptance an immediate priority.

Dealing with a bad situation can be a lot like dealing with grief, and people often go through the same stages: shock and denial, pain and guilt, anger and bargaining, and so on.

You might not be able to fully squelch your emotions, but you can decide to accept what’s happened, regardless of how you feel about it. The sooner you accept it, the sooner you can act from where you are, which is the only way to change how you feel.

It’s like the quote from a recent post on getting started when you don’t feel ready: “Don’t wait for your feelings to change to take action. Take the action and your feelings will change.”

2. Remove fair from your vocabulary.

As kids, we’re all about fair. “He took my train—it’s not fair.” “You said you’d buy me a new bike—it’s not fair!” “I had that crayon first—it’s not fair.”

You’d think we’d learn early on that life isn’t fair, but instead we cling to how we think things should be. Hard work should be rewarded. Kindness should be reciprocated. When things don’t work out that way, we feel angry at the world and bad for ourselves.

Feeling outraged about life’s injustices won’t change the fact that things are often random and beyond your control. When you start going on an unfair spiral, remind yourself, “It is what it is.” And then choose a reaction that aligns with the way you’d like the world to be.

3. Focus on the life lesson.

In Don’t Sweat the Small Stuff, Richard Carlson recommends pretending that everyone is enlightened but you—that everyone you meet is here to teach you something.

In this way, you’ll see someone who annoys or frustrates you as an opportunity to work on your patience. This same mindset can help improve the way you interpret and respond to events in your life.

If you lost your job, perhaps the life lesson is to determine your true purpose. If your relationship falls apart, the life lesson may be to become more independent. Focusing on the lesson allows you to work on positive change, which will make you feel empowered instead of deflated.

4. Question whether it’s as big a problem as it seems.

We often turn minor upsets into huge catastrophes in our minds. Little in life is as horrible as it appears to be at first. Some things are challenging, like losing your job, your home, or worse, someone you love. But most situations can be solved.

Sometimes they’re even blessings in disguise. Barbara Rommer, M.D., interviewed 300 people who’d had near-death experiences. The majority of her subjects experienced spiritual awakenings, proving that what didn’t kill them only made them stronger.

Whatever you’re dealing with, is it really the end of the world? And more importantly, if you bounced back with an even better situation—a higher paying job or a more satisfying relationship—how impressed would you be with yourself?

5. Make “Get strong” your mantra.

You may think Kanye West doesn’t have a place in tinybuddha world, but the dude got one thing right: “N-n-now that which don’t kill me can only make me stronger.”

This idea has saved me many times over. At twenty-one, I spent four months hospitalized with a serious illness and missed my college graduation. So much felt unfair about how it all panned out.

Then I remembered what my friend Rich had told me: “I know you feel powerless right now, but you’re going to rock the world when you get strong.” Whenever I deal with adversity, I remind myself to keep rocking.

6. Remember you can continue from this new place.

It’s easy to get attached to the road you’re on, especially if it makes you happy. When something or someone throws you off, you may feel disconnected from who you want to be or what you want to do in life.

It may help to remember a hurdle doesn’t have to obliterate your plans. Even if you lose your job, you can still pursue your professional goals, and maybe even more efficiently.

There is always more than one way to skin a cat. The sooner you focus on finding a new way, the sooner you’ll turn a bad thing good.

7. Ask yourself how someone you respect would handle the situation.

I recently put my heart into a blogging competition. I had to get votes from the public to win; and I ran a huge campaign to accomplish that. I ended in second place with just over 57,000 votes.

When I didn’t win, I felt disappointed and even a little embarrassed. I’d failed in front of thousands of people.  My best wasn’t good enough.

So I asked myself how someone with integrity would handle the situation. The answer: she’d congratulate the winner, identify everything she learned from the experience, and move on to the next goal with her head held high. Acting on that advice made me feel proud of myself instead of disappointed.

People will remember the things you accomplish, but the way you handle life’s challenges can affect them just as strongly. Life happens, and it isn’t always easy. You can bemoan it and fight it, or see dealing with life’s challenges as the most important challenge of all.

You can’t always get what you want, but you can work at being who you want to be no matter what life throws at you.

Photo here.

Avatar of Lori Deschene

About Lori Deschene

Tiny Buddha Founder Lori Deschene is the author of the Tiny Wisdom eBook series and co-founder of Recreate Your Life Story, an eCourse that helps you change your life. She's now seeking stories for her next book, 365 Tiny Love Challenges from Tiny Buddha. Click here to share your story and follow on Facebook for inspiring posts and wisdom quotes.

Announcement: Want to share your story in the next Tiny Buddha book? Learn more here!
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  • http://twitter.com/nocivus Pedro Assuncão

    Agree 100% with all points, except the last one. I don't think you should ask yourself what other people would do. That will only invite you not to think for yourself, eventually…

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  • glen

    When you think you are right you are wrong. When you think you are wrong you are still wrong…..stop thinking

  • http://honeybtemple2.blogspot.com/ Melissa

    well, you gotta think :-) at least some of the time. And I think asking what other people would do is a valid attempt to take your own personal emotions out of the picture and step away. Remember, you don't have to take their advice. Sometimes I ask myself what I would advise a friend to do who was in the same situation as I am.

    I think it's so important to remember that you are OK where you are, no matter what, and you can start from this new place, as the article says. So often we get bogged down in feeling trapped and unable to move, but where are we going to move from if not from where we are? Acceptance, especially self-acceptance is key.

  • UBERFUZZ

    wise words

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  • Something

    Um, seriously? You think Kanye West made up that “what does not kill me only makes me stronger” line? Sweetheart . . . it was Nietzsche.

  • http://twitter.com/BeMeaningful Lori Deschene

    It was just a joke, friend. =)

  • http://twitter.com/BeMeaningful Lori Deschene

    Hi Pedro. I see your point. I meant more along the lines of considering what the person you want to be would do. Sometimes when you get caught up in emotions it's not always easy to choose your response well. I've found this to be helpful. Thanks for the note!

  • glen

    I hear what you are saying….but I do not completely agree. I am not one who seeks help from others. That is something I need to work on but if I stop thinking and contriving, stop planning and maneuvering the answer is often quite clear. Asking what other people would do is exactly the wrong path to take. Trust your heart and with compassion walk through the day. If you don't know say I do not know.

  • http://twitter.com/BeMeaningful Lori Deschene

    Hi Melissa~ You expressed nicely the idea I was getting at; that this approach allows you to step out of your own emotional space and into a place of rational thinking. “I think it's so important to remember that you are OK where you are, no matter what, and you can start from this new place” <~ agreed!

  • http://twitter.com/BeMeaningful Lori Deschene

    Hi Glen~ I see your perspective. Do you think it might be accurate to say asking what other people would do is the wrong path for YOU to take? Rarely in life is there one path that is right for everyone.

    When I look back at situations in retrospect, it's always clear what I should have done, based on my moral compass and understanding of right and wrong. It's just not always easy to take the path in the moment, when dealing with my emotions.

    Asking yourself what the person you want to be would do helps to overcome that obstacle…at least for me.

  • gsalemi

    “Easy is right. Begin right and you are easy. Continue easy and you are right. The right way to go easy is to forget the right way, and to forget that the going is easy.” Chuang Tzu. I love that quote…it tells me not to think about what path others feel is right, but with ease of heart choose my own. If you need guidance from others to find the way, I think that is absolutely fine. Yes, you are right, asking what other people would do is the wrong path for me….most of the time….lol

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  • philli

    Thank you so much for the excellent advice. It's a huge help. Just what I needed. Peace!

  • philli

    Thank you so much for the excellent advice. It's a huge help. Just what I needed. Peace!

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  • Ddc337

    Love this site…quite new to it. Reading articles incessantly. One comment here…kind of offended by the old saying, “More than one way to skin a cat”. I know it sounds foolish but any kind of reference to animal abuse makes my blood boil.

  • http://twitter.com/lori_deschene Lori Deschene

    I’m glad you’re enjoying the site! I understand that instinct. I didn’t really think about the implications when I used the phrase, because it’s such an old expression. But it’s actually quite morbid when you think about it!

  • Monica_rayes

    Very insightful!

  • huma akbar

    i agreed. Q: i love and respect my husband too much im fully concentrated on him his kids his house hes all happy with me besides this im taking care of his father where as his own  wife means my mother in law is alive but they dont live under one roof although they r not divorsed. i bear his father all the day long whom her own wife cant even… its a one thing, other thing is now mother in law, with whom my 4 year experience is not good at all, is going thru a bad health and my husband demands me to take her to the room next to us so he, of course me could better take care of his mother who the moment is living to my neighbours with her  other sons n daughters…  
    tell me how to response n what to do???

  • butterfly

    So very difficult and painful to overcome a truly tough situation. acceptance is really, really hard.

  • RandyH

    Another great article, Lori…thanks a lot!

  • Natalie

    Great advice! I actually recently wrote an article about dealing with difficult situations using the Resilience Formula. If you’re interested feel free to check it out here http://www.nourish-mindbody.net/?p=111

  • Sylvia

    I love this, thank you so much =) ♡♥♡

  • http://twitter.com/lori_deschene Lori Deschene

    You’re most welcome!