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Actually lots of problems after sudden awakening

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  • #399051
    Helcat
    Participant

    @Peter

    For many the practice detachment has been a about detachment from desire. No desire = no suffering. Probably true only I don’t see how such a practice of detachment would not end in indifference and or unconsciousness.

    I have been reading The Heart of Buddha’s Teaching by Thich Nhat Hanh. The way that he describes overcoming attachment is beautiful. He suggests that rather than indifference it involves loving everyone equally. To me the idea of nonself (I hope that I am using this correctly) is relevant to because it addresses grasping. If we are all part of each other we have nothing to lose. The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying shares this concept of nonself too. Anyone we spend time with will become a part of us. As for developing compassion and empathy for people that we don’t have relationships they suggest recognising that we all have Buddha nature within us.

    To joyfully participate in the sorrows of the world“. So far every wisdom tradition I have come across asks that question. Can you engage fully in life, as it is, the wonder and the horror joyfully? Can that be Love? My intuition is that a experience of enlightenment would involve such a realization.

    Many Buddhist monks are from countries that experienced war so they have written a lot about this subject specifically. They discuss empathising with the soldiers killing their loved ones. Understanding that they are often conscripted with no choice but to participate in war. Not to mention, they may be punished severely if they attempt to desert. Soldiers are considered pawns, not the agents perpetuating the war. Also, we all know the devastating impact on mental health that being a soldier can have. In this way, they were able to love the enemy harming them. Many monks who were imprisoned and punished for their beliefs chose to see that as an excellent opportunity to deepen their practice.

    Tsoknyi Rinpoche shared that many masters have ego and it is a normal healthy part of being a person. His suggestion was to watch the ego and not let it drive action.

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 4 weeks ago by Helcat.
    #399053
    Helcat
    Participant

    @Peter

    My husband was the one who introduced me to Buddhism. He has been blessed to meet many teachers. The most accomplished teacher he worked with was able to experience thought for only 20% of the day.

    Often, my husband says if we were meant to be monks we would have been born monks. Perhaps whatever experiences we are meant to have as laymen are enough? The lessons we experience are the ones we are meant to learn. Who is to say, maybe you will have that experience again when the time is right?

    Another element of the concept of nonself might be helpful here. I believe again this is from The Heart of Buddha’s Teaching. Even anything we see is considered an illusion. What we see is light and the way our brains interpret it. Our sight is limited and the brain will take liberty to fill in the gaps. Our every day experiences as humans are considered illusionary because they are the  experiences of our bodies. If we continue before and after death, and our bodies and all the experiences that go with it die. What remains?

    #399060
    Peter
    Participant

    @Helcat

    I very much apricate your thoughts and sharing of experiences. I find it helpful to hear how others think about such matters. These teachings and experiences are not the easiest to communicate let alone practice.

    I think at my best day I may manage 1% 🙂

    As a young man I was really interested in the Norse myths. Something that stuck with me was the Odin had two ravens that would perch on his shoulders. The ravens were named Huginn (Thought) and Muninn (Memory). The ravens would gather information for Odin who then used the information to shape the world. The Ravens where also know to be speakers for the dead and Oden the Raven god.  In many cultures the Raven regarded as a trickster and co-creators of the world.

    Thought and Memory, tricksters and creators of our experience of our worlds. In that context we are like Odin a ‘god’ of our creation.

    Interesting how if you look close enough through the stories we tell, regardless of culture, that the hints to ‘enlightenment‘ and or ‘to see and  experience the world as it is’ are present. The Buddha laughs as ravens enjoy their tricks to get us to see.

    #399071
    Helcat
    Participant

    @Peter

    I really appreciate you sharing your thoughts and experiences too!

    What you shared is really interesting. It is well known that religion provided moral structure for people. But in times before psychologists, psychiatrists and pharmacology they provided a level of emotional support. It’s a very good reminder!

    Another thing I remember reading about perspective is that you can go on vacation and visit Paris yet never know the true nature of Paris. You can live in Paris for many years and still never know the reality of Paris.

    My interpretation of this is how our unique individual perspectives do not allow us to see reality which is probably composed of  everyone’s experience of Paris.

    #400741
    Kevin
    Participant

    I totally understand what you are going through. Spiritual awakening seems to be a process of birth and death. Growth is not easy because it stretches our current understanding of how things work. Hearing other people’s stories is a way to not feel isolated and to be reminded that we don’t have to stay where we are. Ultimately, all of this comes down to how much we trust God. Do you believe God truly loves you and holds you in the palm of his hand? Picture yourself walking hand in hand with him throughout your day. That is the type of relationship he wants to have with you. This is not a perfect process. I have experienced feelings of rage during my awakening over the past, but all that matters is the present. When we engage with the present, the past becomes an illusion. All that matters is love. Please visit my blog at http://www.myvastman.com to learn about how I have overcome challenges. I’ve only had it about a month, but I think you will find it interesting based on what you have posted here.

    #401842
    Tommy
    Participant

    Another element of the concept of nonself might be helpful here.

     

    An assembly of parts, an aggregate of stuff, all put together to create what we call ourselves. Take it all apart and what we thought was ourselves, it no longer exists. I call myself Tommy. But that is just the name of the nonself created thru this feedback loop that is my body. When death comes, Tommy will no longer be. What was here before Tommy will be here after Tommy. That is Buddha nature. Many of these experiences I have had are simply steps along the way. Some become traps because I wish to linger there. Wish to recapture the bliss and feelings of being part of the whole. And so the experiences fade with time, without practice. I know it is selfish to want to feel happy and joy but still I want it. I suffer the ills and pains from such activities. That is life.

    #401846
    anita
    Participant

    Dear Tommy:

    Good to read back from you! I assume that the inappropriate content tag was a mistake on your part (?) I want to personalize what you shared:

    I am an assembly of parts put together to create what can be seen, heard/ sensed by others as me; I am an assembly of parts that can see, hear/ sense, feel and think. When I die, the parts will come apart and there will no longer be what can see or be seen, hear and be heard, etc. But the Buddha nature that was me and all around me will still be in all assemblies alive and still to come to life.

    Buddha nature is not something that I have, and it is not something that is separate from other living things. It’s something that I am, and that others are just the same.  It is something that all of us humans are whether we ignore it (living unethically, harming others) or acknowledge it (living ethically, doing no harm).

    I cannot feel the Buddha nature by figuring it out with thoughts/words. I can feel it when my mind is calm and free of thoughts and words. The very nature of Buddha nature is, like a member said, is “simply beyond words”.

    anita

    #401866
    Tommy
    Participant

    Anita,

    Yes, I started to fall asleep at the keyboard with my hand on the mouse. Must have done it accidentally. You put the idea of nonself into an easy to understand form. I can see there is much I can learn from you.

    Tommy

    #401871
    anita
    Participant

    Dear Tommy:

    So I understood the idea of non-self correctly? That’s good to know. Thank you for helping to teach me what it means! And there are worse things than sleeping with one’s hand on a mouse, unless it’s a real-life mouse perhaps…

    anita

    #401898
    Tommy
    Participant

    Anita,

    Hi, you do understand. And, you’ve got a sense of humor. Real mouse??? Anyway, I have been slacking off my practice. For many reasons which all seem silly to me now. So, thought I might come here to see if there is any inspiration. Unfortunately, life and its problems have gotten the best of me now. Still, it is good to hear you are here helping people.

    Tommy

    #401900
    anita
    Participant

    Dear Tommy:

    What got the best of you, Tommy? I am here, whether I am helping people, I don’t know, maybe just a bit here and there. People need so much more than typed words on a screen. I asked you what got the best of you but of course you don’t have to answer. I wonder if it’s health problems, I hope you are okay.

    anita

    #401902
    Tommy
    Participant

    Anita,

    Sorry, do not mean to unload my problems here. Just looking for inspiration to continue my efforts on practice. It is tough without a teacher and sangha to help along the way. And like you, I do not want to read more books. So, life’s little problems seem to be bigger than they really are. And, yes, you are helping people. Typed words or not. It is the reaching out for human contact. An understanding ear, a verbal pat on the back, encouragement to go on, a second opinion, even sound advice when least desired are all things that help. They provide compassion where it is needed most. Not too many can do that without it taking its toll on oneself. Oh, got to go. Wife is calling me.

    Tommy

    #401903
    anita
    Participant

    Dear Tommy:

    Thank you for making my day a better day by caring to tell me that I am helping people, and how. This is you encouraging me “to go on… (to) provide compassion where it is needed most”.

    About looking for inspiration to continue your efforts on practice: a 5-15 minutes of a simple slow mindful exercise routine first thing in the morning may awaken inspiration: it’s not about getting in physical shape or losing weight or anything like that, it’s about setting a focus for the day. You decide what kind of exercise works for you. Mine includes crunches and the yoga Warrior 1 and Warrior 2 postures held for a couple of minutes each, as well the open chest (courage) posture.

    The body is great at giving us inspiration, focus and motivation to live and to practice when the thinking brain fails us.

    anita

    #402002
    Tommy
    Participant

    Anita,

    Thanks for words of inspiration. Will try again. Maybe I do have to lose weight and get back into better physical shape.

    Tommy

    #402004
    anita
    Participant

    Dear Tommy:

    You are welcome. Losing weight and getting into better physical shape will make you feel younger- a feeling that can be intoxicating, feeling ALIVE again!

    anita

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 45 total)

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