Menu

"If its meant to happen, it will" vs "If you truly want something, go get it"

HomeForumsEmotional Mastery"If its meant to happen, it will" vs "If you truly want something, go get it"

New Reply

This topic contains 3 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  anita 5 months, 2 weeks ago.

Viewing 4 posts - 1 through 4 (of 4 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #278545

    srk
    Participant

    Hi,

    I am constantly torn between, “If its meant to happen, it will happen” and “If you truly want something, go get it.”

    I recently read a verse in Bhagavad Gita where Lord Krishna says to Arjuna, which roughly translates to, “You only have the right to labour, but you do not have the right to the fruits of your labour.”

    I have also read a quote somewhere which says, “If you truly desire something, the entire Universe conspires to make it happen.”

    The above quotes are in conflict with each other. After a string of failures in my life, in all spheres of my life, I am constantly thinking about these quotes. Which one is true? Which one should I follow?

    Thanks

    #278591

    Cali Chica
    Participant

    Dear SRK,

    I too, have deal with this question often, especially given my background,  I have read and been “taught’ from the Bhagvad Gita often.

    I like that you put both quotes down, especially since so much of what society tells us is – go get em!

    I personally believe that both of these are not in conflict with each other per se – although they do come across very different.

    The first quote from the Gita, emphasizes the concept of not “expecting” when doing good.  In essence, doing good without expectation of good in return.

    The second quote emphasizes, the fact that when you truly, authentically want something – it will happen in due time.

    To me, the first, like much of the Gita, emphasizes the idea of “good” – to do good – is to do it, and not necessarily only when you’re expecting good back.  If that makes sense.

    To me, the second – focuses on a different concept, not necessarily good versus evil, but the concept of that “dreams” can come true if we truly believe in them, authentically, and put the appropriate energy out into the world.  Of course, this is not a “given” as we know the universe does not work as “tit for tat.” We do not just get what we think we deserve if we pray hard enough, wish hard enough.  We usually end up with what is best suited for us, not only what we always “think” we need/deserve.

    Anyway, this may sound rambling – but I would love to know more of what the specific parts of the quotes you are struggling with.  I too, have felt confused by such after a “string” of difficult times in my own life.  I will wait for you to respond before elaborating more.

    #278619

    anita
    Participant

    Dear srk:

    Looking at these quotes with my “beginner’s mind”, the first is senseless:

    “You only have the right to labour, but you do not have the right to the fruits of your labour”- not so, says I: You do the labor, you have the right for the fruits of your labor. (I can imagine an employer using this quote in a court of law after refusing to pay an employee: my employee had the right to work for me, but he didn’t have the right for a paycheck!)

    The second, “If you truly desire something, the entire Universe conspires to make it happen”- to evaluate this quote I will need to know what is the meaning of “Universe”- is it a god, the Earth, collection of plants and stars.. what is it?

    anita

    #278623

    anita
    Participant

    Dear srk:

    More regarding the first quote: depends on the context, if there is a contract between two people, one party is to perform labor for second party, and second party is to pay first for labor done, then when the labor is done, first party is entitled to the money, the fruit of one’s labor.

    Another context: a parent works to feed, clothe, shelter etc.  his child, is he/she entitled for money from the child, once the child is an adult?

    No because there was no contract between the parent and the child. Even if a child promised a parent: when I grow up I will pay you back!,  the child, once an adult, is not bound by that promise, because that verbal promise was not a valid contract. So in this context, the parent is not entitled for the fruit of his/ her labor. For a contract to be valid, both parties have to be old enough and understanding enough to be able to form a contract.

    anita

    • This reply was modified 5 months, 2 weeks ago by  anita.
Viewing 4 posts - 1 through 4 (of 4 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic. Please log in OR register.