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Intrusive and Anxious Thoughts

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Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 55 total)
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  • #428453
    anita
    Participant

    Dear Kshiti:

    You are very welcome and of course it’d be okay for you to share your values and goals in a couple of days, or whenever you have the time and the state of mind to do so. I wish you well in your studies!

    anita

     

    #428705
    kshiti1502
    Participant

    Dear Anita,

    Hope this message finds you well! Very sorry for my long absence. Thanks for checking out on me. I think I am in a better headspace now to talk about this.

    About values, I did an exercise a few weeks ago where I needed to categorize all the values I found relevant into four sections and then take one value from the each section. The values I came down to are- Success, Personal Development, Well-Being and Growth. But I feel this is not the complete thing and I need to do more work to develop better perspectives.

    Regarding goals, I tried to think on this topic in one of the entries of my gratitude journal. Here is what I could come up in terms of concrete goals- 1)researching in my areas of interest as an academician, 2)contributing to my field through my work, 3) developing a solid knowledge base, 4)personal and spiritual growth, 5)engaging with literature through publications and reading books 6)spending time with and being around my friends and loved ones. How to develop a greater sense of purpose and develop a better approach towards the core component of my life?

     

    Also, I would like to ask you about mindfulness. How can one apply it for anxiety and intrusive thoughts as well as for overall wellbeing?

     

    Thank you

    #428707
    anita
    Participant

    Dear Kshiti: I will read and reply in the next 24 hours.

    anita

    #428724
    anita
    Participant

    Dear Kshiti:

    You are welcome, and no problems as to you taking your time before replying.

    The values I came down to are- Success, Personal Development, Well-Being and Growth. But I feel this is not the complete thing and I need to do more work to develop better perspectives“- you can develop your thoughts about professional success in the context of relationships with people you interact with professionally. There are people who are okay with cheating and mistreating others so to get ahead professionally; what are your values in regard to how you would treat others and how you expect to be treated in the professional world?

    You can develop well-being in the context of personal relationships, similar to the above: what are your values in regard to how you treat others in your personal life, and how do you expect them to treat you?

    You listed very impressive goals. “How to develop a greater sense of purpose and develop a better approach towards the core component of my life?“- this reads to me like an academic-like, complicated question. Can you simplify this question for me?

    Also, I would like to ask you about mindfulness. How can one apply it for anxiety and intrusive thoughts as well as for overall wellbeing?“- re-read my Feb 21 post (page 2 of your thread) where you asked a similar question (only you didn’t mention Mindfulness) and I answered: the NPARR Strategy, which is a Mindfulness technique that works for me. Try it in regard to your obsessive (aka intrusive) thoughts, will you?

    And please feel comfortable to post again whenever you choose, whenever it is convenient for you, no need to rush.

    anita

    #429012
    kshiti1502
    Participant

    Dear Anita,

     

    Thank you very much. I will share the simplified question and other things soon. Right now I would want to focus on the second part, because my intrusive thoughts have again begun to consume me, and I am having a breakdown everyday because of them. I’m trying the strategy but isn’t doing much help. What should I do ?

     

    Kind regards

    #429016
    anita
    Participant

    Dear Kshiti:

    You are welcome. I am sorry about the worsening situation in regard to your intrusive thoughts. I don’t think that we talked about you seeing a doctor, did we?

    There are pharmaceutical treatments for intrusive thinking/ OCD, certain medications that help many, and can help you. What do you think about making an appointment with a doctor, for evaluation and possible treatment?

    anita

     

    #429017
    kshiti1502
    Participant

    Dear Anita,

    Thanks for your reply. It won’t be possible for me to see a doctor because of financial restraints as well as the possibile complications with my spine disease, and I personally dont want to go on that road. Is there anything else I should try doing that might help me?

     

    Thanks

    #429018
    anita
    Participant

    Dear Kshiti:

    Yes, what if you re-read my posts so far, in your thread, and take notes, then come up with a clear, organized paper listing practical things that you can do to help yourself, things that do not involve going to the doctor, or spending money? Then show me that paper, on the screen, that is, will you?

    anita

    #429019
    kshiti1502
    Participant

    Dear Anita,

     

    Thank you. I will do that and come up with an organized list.

     

    Thanks

    Kshitij

    #429020
    anita
    Participant

    You are welcome, Kshitij!

    anita

    #430406
    kshiti1502
    Participant

    Dear Anita,

    I hope this thread finds you well. I am sending a list of pointers that I think can be done or applied for helping me with my intrusive thoughts. Please have a look-

    1. Using the NPARR strategy whenever possible. I have observed that doing assignments/solving questions at that moment helps me to engage with something else.
    2. I should make a mental note of how my intrusive thoughts are affecting my quality of life in the PRESENT and giving me more anxiety and negativity. I can remember this thought whenever I feel I am ruminating
    3. Starting JPMR again. My therapist had taught me this when my anxiety and panic attacks were on the peak during 2022. I can resume it in the night time when I get intrusive thoughts quite often.
    4. Monitoring my web surfing. I often begin reading/scrolling through content that triggers my anxiety and as a result intrusive thinking.
    5. Preparing a written note containing my values and purpose(s) and keeping it handy so that I can have a look at it whenever I begin obsessing over my thoughts.

    Thanks

    Kshitij

    #430446
    anita
    Participant

    Dear Kshitij:

    1. Using the NPARR strategy whenever possible. I have observed that doing assignments/solving questions at that moment helps me to engage with something else.“- good plan, use it regularly.

    2. I should make a mental note of how my intrusive thoughts are affecting my quality of life in the PRESENT and giving me more anxiety and negativity. I can remember this thought whenever I feel I am ruminating“- this can be part of the Notice of the NPARR: Notice that you are ruminating and say to yourself: I am ruminating. Notice you are feeling anxious and say to yourself: I feel anxious.

    Then Pause the rumination, and take a slow,  easy breath, then Adress the situation (if there is a situation that caused your anxiety to go up) and ask yourself: what is the problem in this situation?  Is there anything I need to say or do, so to solve this problem?

    If there is no situational problem, then say, the problem is my anxiety going up, solution: bring it down.

    Then Respond:  do what needs to be said or done so to solve the problem, if it is situational. If the elevated anxiety is not a result of a situation, take a few slow, easy breaths.

    And then Redirect: to relax further, when possible, redirect to taking a short walk, a hot shower, listening to music, and/ or dancing, etc., otherwise, focus on an assignment/ solving questions (like you wrote in #1)

    #3, 4, 5 read fine. Good job, Kshitij !!!

    anita

     

    #431517
    kshiti1502
    Participant

    Dear Anita,
    <p style=”text-align: left;”>Thanks for your detailed feedback. I feel the situation to be better at the moment, and I have been able to deal with moments of intrusive thinking most of the times if not every single time. But somewhere in my mind I feel that whatever I experience is not only because of ruminating over certain thoughts, it’s not just about that. What scares me is how I visualise myself while imagining what if situations, how I imagine myself weeping in a close room shutting myself from everything else, with no desire to do anything for self care or for taking myself out of that situation. Looking back now, I feel I was indulging in self destructive activities back then during the time of distress and my intrusive thoughts include doing such self destructive activities in my what if scenarios. One thing that occured to me as a possible reason was lack of self compassion, but I am not very sure. Sometimes I feel as if I am getting depressed even though everything is going well right now.</p>
     

     

    #431522
    Roberta
    Participant

    Dear Kshiti1502

    I am reading a book by Richard Moss called Inside-Out Healing which I have found to be outstandingly helpful with understanding the stories we tell ourselves & the feelings they evoke.

    Best wishes

    Roberta

     

    #431523
    anita
    Participant

    Dear Kshiti:

    You are welcome!

    What scares me is how I visualise myself while imagining what if situations, how I imagine myself weeping in a closed room shutting myself from everything else, with no desire to do anything for self care or for taking myself out of that situation– what you are describing here is depression and helplessness- the feeling that you are unable to help yourself, giving up on trying.

    I mentioned helplessness to you back on page 1 of your thread, but I don’t think that I brought up the topic of learned helplessness.

    very well mind/ learned helplessness: “Learned helplessness occurs when a person who has experienced repeated challenges comes to believe they have no control over their situation. They then give up trying to make changes and accept their fate. In animals, learned helplessness occurs when an animal is repeatedly subjected to an aversive stimulus that it cannot escape. Eventually, the animal will stop trying to avoid the stimulus and behave as if it is utterly helpless to change the situation. Even when opportunities to escape are presented, this learned helplessness will prevent any action…

    <article id=”wellness-article_1-0″ class=”comp mntl-article–three-column sc-ad-container primary-image right-rail wellness-article mntl-article” data-tracking-container=”true”>

    <p id=”mntl-sc-block_1-0-4″ class=”comp mntl-sc-block mntl-sc-block-html”>”When people feel that they have no control over their situation, they may begin to behave in a helpless manner. This inaction can lead people to overlook opportunities for relief or change… People may be left feeling that no matter what they do or how hard they work, nothing will make a difference…</p>

    </article><article id=”wellness-article_1-0″ class=”comp mntl-article–three-column sc-ad-container primary-image right-rail wellness-article mntl-article” data-tracking-container=”true”>

    <p id=”mntl-sc-block_1-0-60″ class=”comp mntl-sc-block mntl-sc-block-html”>”Learned helplessness often originates in childhood, and unreliable or unresponsive caregivers can contribute to these feelings… When children need help but no one comes to their aid, they may be left feeling that nothing they do will change their situation. Repeated experiences that bolster these feelings of helplessness and hopelessness can result in growing into adulthood ultimately feeling that there is nothing one can do to change his or her problems. Some common symptoms of learned helplessness in children include: Failure to ask for help, Frustration, Giving up, Lack of effort, Low self-esteem, Passivity, Poor motivation, Procrastination.</p>
    <p class=”comp mntl-sc-block mntl-sc-block-html”>”Learned helplessness can also result in anxiety, depression, or both.11 When kids feel that they’ve had no control over the past events of their lives, they gain the expectation that future events will be just as uncontrollable. Because they believe that nothing they do will ever change the outcome of an event, kids are often left thinking that they should not even bother trying…”.</p>
    Learned helplessness is evident in wat you shared back in Feb: “I get flashbacks of what I felt during that time, some examples are – ‘nothing ever gets better’ ‘there is no point of looking for my wellbeing’…  I began feeling that just when things started to become better, they went for worse… I began to think that it’s pointless to keep hopes as all I got was traumatic setbacks again and again… I felt that no matter how much I tried, things would always get worse”.

    What do you think about this, Kshiti?

    anita

    </article> 

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 55 total)

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